Tag Archives: singer-songwriter

My Unplanned Obsolescence. By Thom Topham. Chapter 10.

13 May

Poverty, Promiscuity, Paranoia, Parables… and Princesses.

TT 1979

“Sat. 6. 7. ‘79.

£5 to last the rest of my life!

The future of humanity will not manifest itself performing under The Westway.  Stories… tales of the shitty city.  A fenced-in expression of society’s disgust.  I should, I could have got up on that stage and shouted it out, but the bedraggled audience were too scraggy and insignificant to make it worth my while.

At least, on this occasion, it was possible for any no-hoper to get up and scream out his pain/ego/demons/traumas (delete where applicable) to a raggle-taggle hotchpotch of old hippies, Hells Angels, tourists, freaks, punks, leather-queens, gender-benders, chick-with-dicks, proto-anarchists, members of campaign groups such as Rock Against Racism and Legalise Cannabis… and me.

The DJs seemed to be running the show, with a rather irritating and unnecessary, vaguely Rastaaaafariii (mostly white) running commentary on the mic’, echoing around the arch beneath the motorway to the two or three hundred people drifting around, or sitting on the stony ground getting drunk and/or stoned.

Chain-link fences, barbed wire, concrete, graffiti, rusting corrugated iron, struggling saplings, and rubbish everywhere.

A tube train rattled by and at first I thought that it was part of the music. Hey, I confess that I broke one of my own rules by having a daytime joint,

Punk is so dated already, so last year; but I have a certain admiration for the whole ghetto-gang shabang. Hippies and punks, gays and football hooligans, Rastafarians and trustafarians, rude boys and rent boys and all the variants thereof. The un-united tribes of London.  Everything sub-cultural and ‘minority’ eventually gets absorbed into the mainstream (which is so typically British), from the Westway to the West Coast of the US. Perhaps it gets subjugated and absorbed into the blandness of it all, exploiting its inherent weakness, finding cracks; the San Andreas Fault, searching for eccentric Americans who’ve discovered irony living under a rock.  Intelligent neurosis is soft-centred… and a harder nut to crack.

Sunday 7. 7. ’79. < < < Three sevens! Wowee?  Full moon? I hope so. I enjoy a bit of mystical madness.

Slept and slept and slept. Am I cracking up? William played god today – gave me a fiver. The phone is not working – has it been cut-off again? Is there anything else left to go wrong? Oh!  The gas is still on, at least. Feel like getting drunk.

Monday 8. 7. ’79.

Yep, that was a good idea. I actually felt confident and relaxed and had a good time at the dreaded Bellstaff in Earls Court – England’s oldest gay pub (usually with a clientele to match – but this time it was different, if you ignored all the old leather- queens discussing opera and musical theatre), as I met a bouncy Yank who was both a music teacher and a gymnast – a near-perfect combination. His name is Mike and he has hard muscles and baby hair. Made me feel alive again – so much so that I couldn’t sleep. I guess that’s the price you pay on the rare occasion when you meet what appears to be a truly desirable man:  chunky, hunky, funky, spunky, punky… great sex, warmth and intellect too!  He thought I was Spanish or Italian initially – so do lots of people.

What am I going to do for four days before I see Johnny and Thomas? Arghh! No money.  Must try and relax – but how? I’m in the danger zone again and my Wurlitzer is virtually unplayable – there’s something wrong with the mechanism behind the notes. And I want Alfred.  HELP!

Now I’ve been round to see him and I don’t think I want him anymore.  How refreshing to be wrong.”

I put down the book, and try to remember who Johnny, Thomas and Alfred were – or maybe still are.  Thirty one years eh? William, I can still vouch for as a talented screen-writer and conceptualist who never really ‘made it’ (sound familiar anyone?) who now runs a video shop in his native Scotland, somewhere near Inverness, I believe, so I never see him, although we still crack jokes with each other on People Pages. ‘Home-made’ ones, as it were, as opposed to the ‘have you heard the one about the whatever’ variety, which tend to spout from ‘blokes’ whose mates repeat some racist or sexist joke ‘down the pub’ and viralise it, fueled by a pint or six. Shudder. A truly redundant form of recycling, without any apparent benefits to anyone, apart from the malignant, macho morons of this world.

In my diary, however.  I was evidently having a terrible time of merely surviving, despite having a music-publishing deal.  The phone was regularly being cut off, due to my non-payment of the bill (although it makes me chuckle to recall that I’d usually get it put back on using a different name).

Back in the 70s there were red phone boxes on many street corners. A story springs to mind. The nearest one to me when I was still living in the dingy basement at St Dukes Road in 1979 was outside the wonderful Spanish deli that used to be next door to the local pub on Westbourne Grove, the name of which I’ve forgotten (it’s probably been renamed The Royal Trustafarian now). One sunny afternoon I raided my ‘change pot’ to use the phone box (copper coins were acceptable in those days), which was occupied when I got there. I only realized this when I tugged open the door (they are quite heavy, as anyone over forty might remember) to find myself almost walking straight into a beautiful young, mixed-race man, wearing khaki shorts and a white vest, which displayed his muscular limbs to perfection.  I apologized profusely. He smiled, looked me in the eye, cupped his hand over the receiver and said, softly and sweetly: ‘I won’t be long’, then continued to smile at me whilst talking on the phone as I waited outside, smiling back at him.

Something was afoot!

When he came out I patted him lightly on the shoulder and said “Oh bugger the phone call, I’d rather bugger you!’ Or… probably  something less crudely forward.

My ‘gaydar’ had indeed been correct and we ended up having a wonderful time… and beautiful, fabulous sex.  Better still, he was actually an apprentice footballer with West Ham. Phwooooar!  Fantasy, or what? Sadly, I never saw him again.  I used to look out for him for years whenever The Hammers were on TV, to no avail.  I guess I’ll never know what happened to him… unless, of course, he’s reading this.

The iPhone ‘tings’ and I pick it up see that I’ve had a missed called from my French friend Marcel. The signal here in Cornwall is so pathetic that you have to go outside and walk up the Cleave for about thirty yards to even text someone.  It’s not only my mobile broadband dongle suffering from unplanned obsolescence: albeit temporarily. Both sim cards are on O!U, whose nearest mast, as you might recall, is ten miles (over the hills and far) away.

I call back Marcel on the landline. He answers ‘Allo…’ slightly questioningly, as he obviously doesn’t recognize this Cornish number. French accents are always so pleasing on the ear, I find, especially when the participants are being mischievous, or telling jokes. The French also ‘get’ irony, it would seem.

‘Marcel, hey, it’s Thom – I’m at the cottage in Cornwall – you called mon petit ami straight?’

He chuckles at my Franglais.

Oui, mon vieux queer Anglaise… how is ze wethurr down there?’

‘It’s parfait, mate, beacoup de soleil, et je suis un petit brun!  How are you – what was the call in aid of?’

‘I’m good mon ami.  Well, I have this French friend who came to visit London for the first time and he wanted to go – can you believe it? – to The Hard Rock café…’

‘…The HARD ROCK CAFÉ?  NO-one in London EVER goes there!  Only tourists!’

‘Exactomundo!’ Says Marcel ‘but he really wanted to go ; anyway, after queuing for about half an hour – big yawnz – we got a table for two right in the middle of the restaurant by the central pillar, underneath your album Mediums…’

‘No! What? You’re kidding me?’

‘No I’m not!  My friend was very impressed when I said that I knew you. The depiction of your album on the pillar is like a glass painting of the cover, an etching perhaps, and it’s back-lit, just above head height.’

I don’t believe it!’ I say, doing a Victor Meldrew; ‘but… that means it must have been there for over thirty-six years! I simply don’t believe it!’

‘Well, you do ‘ave one foot in ze grave!’

Yes, hmm, well, let’s NOT go there right now…

 ‘I’ve been FRAMED – and I didn’t even know!’

Oui, oui, c’est vrai, mais ce n’est pas mal!’

‘I guess not.  Sometimes you get happy mediums when you least expect them.’

Oui oui! Like my hamburger at the Hard Rock – I asked for mediums rare…’

‘… and they brought you a well-done, old friend on the pillar! Cha boom!’

‘Ze mediums is ze message!’

We both laugh.

‘Well, thanks for letting me know – I’m genuinely shocked.  And the weird thing is that it was reissued last year on Grapes Of Wrath Records.  I think I might have to write a song about it called You’ve Been Framed!’

‘Nice play-on-words Thom. I’ve got to go – le touriste wants to go to Madame Tussaud’s…’

‘…Is it still THERE? At least Madame Tussaud was French.  Now if you can persuade him to go somewhere that’s cool AND Franglais, you should take him to The Café De Paris.’

‘Ah hah! That’s a good idea. Didn’t you play there with your band… with the famous drummer?’

‘…BiJingo.  Yes, in 2007. Our one and only gig.’

‘Well, c’est la vie.  I ‘av to go!’

Au revoir. A bientot!!’

You’be been framed  hovers in my mind like a word-cloud which is about to produce light, summer rain – in the form of arcane, poetic lyrics. So, I instinctively pick-up my current notebook and start to write.  It comes pouring out just like the epic title track of my first album ‘Mediums’ (that has famously, of course, been on the central pillar of The Hard Rock Café for over thirty-six years), which was written from ‘spirit’ and was actually about what the lyrics pertained to – automatic writing – just like when I wrote intuitively about the secret garden and the oubliette dungeon in the environs of the cathedral in Ibiza town back in ’88.

 You’ve Been Framed

Look out for the hidden messages…

No nothing will ever be the same

You are the flotsam and jetsam of the past.

And people who refuse to play the game

will be guaranteed to always be the last

In the queue where no-one knows your name

you are forgotten like 80s ghetto blasters,

it’s so cynical and clinical, oh the shame

like a roller-coaster ride that’s always going faster…

You’ve been framed – like a Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster,

You gotta play the game to please your masters.

Hung up on a wall for ever after, in the hall of fame of tears and laughter..

You’ve been framed, you’ve been named.  It will never be the same.

In the middle of London’s Hard Rock Cafe – look out for the hidden messages….

Seen in every portrait, there’s a truth and there’s a lie

and everything that you were taught is an idea coming from on high,

Look out for the hidden messages….

by the spin doctors of phoney thoughts,  religions based on power,

hypocrisy from twisted minds who would crush anything that flowers.

Look out for the hidden messages….

In the queue where no-one knows your name,

you are forgotten like 80s ghetto blasters,

it’s so cynical and clinical, oh the shame

like a roller-coaster ride that’s always going faster…

You’ve been framed – like a Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster,

You gotta play the game to please your masters.

Look out for the hidden messages….

Hung up on every wall for ever after, in the hall of fame of tears and laughter,

You’ve been Framed, you’ve been named. It will never be the same.

In the middle of London’s Hard Rock Cafe – look out for the hidden messages.

You’ve been framed.

 (Words and music by Thom Topham ©  Copyright Control.  All Rights Reserved).

The Interior Of London's Hard Rock Cafe

The Interior Of London’s Hard Rock Cafe

Joyce the cleaner pops her head around the door and says brightly: ‘Right, that’s me all done, I just need to put the Hoover back in the cupboard under the stairs. Well, it’s not a Hoover, it’s a Henry – isn’t it funny how we call all vacuum cleaners Hoovers?’

‘…even Dysons,’ I interject, with a chuckle, ‘and all ball-point pans are Biros, regardless.  Well, that’s the power of good branding I guess.’

She puts the Henry back in the cupboard under the stairs in the corner, then nods in the direction of my open notebook and asks: ‘Writing a song then?’

‘I think so.  It looks like it’s going to be called You’ve Been Framed – a bit of a play on words.’

‘Sounds interesting… do you think Amy Winehouse has been framed by the press, what with them hounding her all the time? Do you know her? I think she’s so talented, but somehow so screwed-up.’

‘Well, she’s certainly a rich source of stories for the tabloids – partly her own fault, I guess, with what appears to be her addictive personality and her apparent lack of self-esteem.  I think that she’s incredibly talented and deserves every plaudit that comes her way. I don’t actually know her, but I do know her bass player and guitarist – both of them have played at my jam sessions on several occasions.  I’m particularly friendly with Dave Daleham – he’s her musical director. He played bass on three of my BiJingo tracks’

‘Ooh – I love your BiJingo stuff as well! But what about that awful, junkie husband of hers – he went to prison didn’t he?’

Love Is A Losing Game indeed – that’s my favourite Amy song.  Well, they divorced last year, thank god. She’s a got a new boyfriend now, he’s a film director, I believe.’

‘I hope she cleans-up her act, otherwise I think she might kill herself with all that excess…’  She trails off, then shakes her head and adds brightly: ‘Anyway, I must  be off!  Lovely to chat.  Hope to see you again soon!’

‘I’ve got to get the train back to London at 4, or should I say sixteen hundred hours? I always hate to leave, especially when the weather is so wonderful. You take care!’

I’m about to go and sit on the sea wall in the sunshine, perhaps for one last time, when a cloud obscures the sun, and a  sudden, silvery drizzle forms a gossamer curtain out in the bay.  I go out to the front door and watch as it approaches; then a huge rainbow suddenly appears above the village. The mythical pot of gold is up on what I call the Field Of Gravity, I muse to myself, then wonder if it’s a sign of sorts.  My fantasy of a potential, magical festival…

 There’s still a while before I have to get the bus back to Raleigh, so I make myself some more minty tea in the kitchen, then decide to dip-back into the roller-coaster year of ’79, wondering if the fortunes of my twenty seven-year old self had improved yet. It’s July the fourteenth, I observe, as I open the notebook. When did Leonardo, the Italian Count, eventually take me to New York? Was it in September of that year that I suddenly had some rocket-fuelled success? I don’t want to’ cheat’ by fast-forwarding; I’d like to understand my mind-set-of-the-time more fully.  After all, this is the first time I’ve read this notebook in – gasp! – over thirty years!

“Sat. 14. 7. 79

I have to thank the weather and various angels for helping me out this last week.  Beautiful sunshine and sultry summer nights. The last few days have been unusually carefree, apart from the ever-present paranoia about my relentless poverty.  On Thursday I waited for over three hours to see Stirling Johnson – my music publisher – who was getting pissed with someone who is vaguely famous and not very talented.  Eventually I got to play the arrogant bastard my new songs and he said that he really liked them,  declaring himself to be definitely impressed. Really. Impreshed.  Well, he was stupidly drunk.  Got home and collapsed, with just 20p in my pocket.

Later on, I decided to take John and Joseph a cassette and they loved the songs, cooked us all a delicious meal and gave me a lift to the Trop’, where Rick, my regular fuck-buddy, ex-army hunk and a working rent boy – well, rent man (not that he’d dream of charging me) – supplied me with money for drinks all night – and I somehow managed to come out with a profit!  Enough for brunch the next day.

On Wednesday, Jeremy had rescued me with a perfect day at The Y (Y.M.C.A) on Tottenham Court Road and dinner at Fred Dexter’s – where he’s the Maitre D’, of course. Fabulous.

On Thursday I’d ended-up having a good honest fuck with Mark – again – with some emotional response, for a change.

On Friday, Jeremy did it again by treating me to a swim and a sauna at the Y followed by dinner at Melksham’s in Covent Garden (an English restaurant specializing in pies, owned by the eponymous noble lord), where we stuffed ourselves silly. Then on to the Trop’, somewhat predictably, where everyone seemed unusually laid-back – must’ve been the glorious weather.

There were even scores of attractive men, including someone I’ve been after for years (I’ve even dedicated poems to him in the past), but he’d never seemed tempted. On Friday, I sensed that he was aware of my presence and was making a bad job of ignoring me and trying not to smile; but evidently he was with a bunch of friends.

We finally made contact; the attraction seemed mutual, yet muted. Then, as he left, (he appeared to be quite drunk), I called cheekily ‘Do I have to wait another five years?’

Jeremy and I had decided that it was time to leave and we hung around outside, as did lots of other people – I was feeling quite sozzled –  then Mr Five-Years-Of Nothing came back around the corner and smiled at me as he came close and I just said: ‘Will you come home with me?’ And he said ‘Yes’.

I was surprised… but not really.

Name: Den.  Occupation: dog-handler.  Face: beautiful.  Smile: melter! Nice man, easy-going, relaxed. We made LOVE… I’d almost forgotten what it was like. It was a shame that he had to leave at dawn to get back to his dogs.

I slept very well and woke-up feeling fresh and alive – and it was another beautiful day.  The song ‘Oh What A Beautiful Morning’ from ‘My Fair Lady’ was running on repeat in my head, which was quite annoying, but still made me smile. I had brunch in the café in Holland Park with Christa, but there was a slight tension between us, which is unusual. I think it’s maybe because I’m broke and she, quite rightly, resents giving me handouts. We spent the afternoon in the park with the dogs and I bumped into Francisco… and we talked. He seemed pleased to see me. I think he’s one of the most beautiful men I’ve ever met (and shagged) – a true, golden Adonis.  He’s Portuguese, tall and athletic, with dark olive skin and naturally blond, curly hair. I was hoping that he’d like a re-run of our passionate night together a few weeks ago. I certainly wouldn’t object.  I’d met him in the Italian Garden in Hyde Park – another popular, yet more subtly, dare-I-say discreet (I hate that word) cruising spot in ‘The Royal Parks’ at the Western end of the Serpentine lake. He has to go to work – he’s a waiter – but he smiled as he walked away, backwards, holding an imaginary phone to his ear. Good – that means he’s going to call.“

I stroke my goatee thoughtfully as a bunch of kids on mini-scooters clatter noisily by the cottage’s windows – and endeavor to remember if I ever saw Francisco again.  I recall that he lived in a basement bed-sit in Bayswater (sounds like a line from a song by The Betting Shop Boys) and we had a romantic fling for a while, before his father suddenly, unexpectedly died and he had to return to Lisbon, never to be seen again. Sigh. Not exactly a Portuguese Man O’War, but certainly another fine ship that passed in the night.

I flick through the notebook again – lots of lyric-writing (‘By The Ruins Of The Hanging Gardens Of Babylon’ about the cruising area of Hampstead Heath, for instance); angst about survival – I was truly living on a knife-edge – and philosophical musings and poetry, such as:

‘Lying in the sun, in the alcoholics’ garden, with the noise of the traffic drowning out the birds.  Nothing to be done; survival getting harder, another day of tension as I’m just waiting for the word.’

Then more and more increasingly solid and assured strong structures – lyrics, chords and melodies (I always write the principle notes of the main melody above the lyrics) –  start to develop through the pages.  The album was evidently beginning to take shape, not that I knew that at the time.  Having made some very basic ‘demo-demos’ in the poorly-equipped little studio at Warmer Music, although actually getting a couple of days in there was something of an achievement in itself.  However, I wasn’t very pleased with them, despite the fact that my drunken publisher had been impreshed ; there was something lacking – like a backing band – a goddamn 70s Linn drum machine does not provide sufficient oomph.  I’d been hassling my publisher  (whose company Big Ben Music was licenced through Warmer Music) to cough-up some money to put me in a proper studio with the musicians of my choice.  Then I found myself budgeting for that eventuality, making lists of goals, songs, people to see in the music biz… and starting to take control of my life, not just languishing in my ongoing poverty.

This approach was soon, at last, to reap dividends. Sterling had finally agreed to fund the sessions to the tune of £250 – which, however,  simply wasn’t enough.  I’d worked-out that I needed around £450 (which would be about equivalent to ten times that amount today) to get the results I needed.  But Leonardo had promised to help me fund some demos – so everything was swifly falling into place.  The knowledge that I’d finally won the support of my publisher, as well as The Count  had spurred me on to write some powerful, dark-yet-uplifting songs.  The project was evolving into a potential concept album about life on the streets, cruising and survival; and what would become the apposite title track ‘Torn Genes’ had started developing in my notebook

‘Torn genes, from the leather queens, to the cowboys and the clones.

Torn genes, from some magazines, not just words, but sticks and stones.

Torn genes, like those darker dreams, that can chill you to the bone.

Torn genes, like a silent scream, then you’re walking home alone…’

So often, I would walk home from the bars and clubs in Earls Court through the beautiful, half mile-long Holland Walk, a curiously romantic place, both visually and in my mind. I used to love singing soulfully there, just making stuff up, whilst drifting in my own world and heading for my bed, or perhaps, someone to share it with (which often happened as well, generally organically, rather than by the homogenous ‘gay rules’ of detachment).  I didn’t give a damn what people thought.   Reading those rather dark and dissolute lyrics reminds me of a series of extraordinary incidents which occurred on ‘The Walk’ which are related by a common thread: it was either the threat or the actuality of violence… but there was also always the risk of being arrested simply for being there, or for shagging in the park, having jumped over the fence. On other occasions there could be high farce, like the time I was heading home via ‘The Walk’ and heard raucous laughter in the distance. As I reached the second locked gate that led into the park, I was astonished to see three drunken, uniformed policemen on the other side waving daffodils – it must have been spring –  at the astonished cruisers. Yes, I really had to pinch myself, blink and shake my head with that particular vignette. It wasn’t a hallucination – it really happened.

In the early hours of another morning that year, I remember crossing Kensington High Street and entering Holland Walk through those huge, ornate gates, which were always open – as it was a pedestrian thoroughfare (to the immediate left, the curvaceous green roof and the turquoise façade of the 50s architectural gem The Commonwealth Institute used to provoke fantasies of me turning it into the most unusual club in London.  I believe that these days it’s standing empty, which is a great shame, and a waste of a great space). On this occasion, however, I ‘smelt’ that something wasn’t quite right. Why was there a great wave of woofters –  some with dogs – heading towards me at speed?  As they approached, I asked a cloney bloke with two, large chocolate-brown poodles, what was going on – was there a police raid? He replied that that wasn’t the case, but that there was a large gang of youths shouting abuse and causing trouble.  I asked whether they were queer-bashing people –  and he replied that he wasn’t sure if they were or not.

So I started shouting at the fleeing faggots, admonishing them for being a bunch of pansy cowards. Why wouldn’t they just turn around – complete with ‘attack-poodles’ – and face-up to their erstwhile attackers, who were apparently a bunch of kids?  There were at least a hundred of us – so I suggested that we face-up the little fuckers!  They ignored me and streamed out of the gates. What a bunch of wusses.

I was determined to not be beaten (either figuratively or literally) by some ignorant teenaged boys, so strode manfully up ‘The Walk’ singing soulfully, as was my wont, until I reached the bench that was positioned by the entrance to the Youth Hostel, which is all that remains of Holland House, the park being its former grounds, which had been purchased by London County Council in the the year I was born, from it’s last owner, the 6th Earl Of Ilchester (it says here  on my MAC – now that I’m editing and revising all this at home: ah – the joys of Google and Wikipedia!).

I sat down on the bench and started to make a roll-up.  I could hear the ‘gang’ approaching, but their shouting was becoming more and more muted, as there was obviously no-one left to abuse – apart from me, I suppose. Eventually, it just became teenaged chatter as they drew level with where I was sitting, as I lit my cigarette. I nodded at them – they looked about 17 or 18 years-old and there were perhaps twelve of them, mostly white. There were three mixed-race boys too. One of them asked me for a light and I lit his cigarette for him, asking him what all the shouting was about. He replied that ‘they were just having a bit of a laugh’.  The other boys shuffled their feet sheepishly.

‘You’re not queer are you?’ Asked a white boy, as if to suggest that I couldn’t be, because I didn’t look it.

‘Does it matter whether I am or am not? I suggested, shrugging, with a grin. ‘As it happens, I am, and I don’t give a damn what you think…’

‘You don’t look queer mate,’ said the mixed-race boy with the cigarette, ‘what’s it like to be a homo?’

I suggested that, if they’d like to know, that they were welcome; but to bear in mind that not all queers, homos or gay people, were homogenous, or  ‘the same’, but that we were a minority which comprised different cultures and personalities, predilections and preferences, just like black people, for instance, and that, ultimately, we were just human beings. Then I started revealing the names of some famous people – singers, sports-people – who were gay (if not ‘out’) and that really grabbed their interest and soon they were sitting on the grass in front of me in a neat semi-circle. The ‘queer-bashers’ had been neutralized – and I was rather pleased that my devil-may-care – perhaps brave – approach had worked.  It could have all turned out quite differently, but my instincts proved to be correct.

After about half an hour of ‘education’ from Thom T – it transpired that they all attended the famously liberal, comprehensive school which was adjacent to the park – they all shook my hand and trooped off – newly enlightened; leaving me with a smile on my face and  sporting a pleasantly proactive, metaphorical productivity badge.

On another occasion – I think it was a couple of years earlier –  I had been heading home through ‘The Walk’ on a cold autumn night – it was pretty deserted as a result – and heard a commotion up ahead and came across a white thug actually attacking a black guy, who I assumed to be gay. My survival instinct kicked-in so I shouted forcefully at him to stop, which, to my amazement he did, and ran off. The black guy was just a bit winded and his face (which was very handsome) was bleeding slightly.

Once he’d caught his breath, he smiled, looked me in the eye (he had huge, soulful eyes) and thanked me profusely for rescuing him, and asked if I would like to come for a drink at his flat around the corner in Philbeach Gardens (how very posh!). I happily agreed and was pleased when he hugged me, This not-so-beaten homosexual appeared to be one beautiful (and, as it soon transpired) intelligent and charming man.

His flat was a spacious, one-bedroom garden flat which was very stylish and chic – he evidently had style and taste as well.  I asked him his name as he poured me a Remi Martin.

‘Rodney Meadows’, he replied.

That rang a bell somewhere… wasn’t he the up-and-coming couturier who’d grown-up in a children’s home?

‘Didn’t I read something about you in The Evening News?’ I asked, as he handed me a large brandy glass – swilling it around and taking a grateful gulp.

‘Yeah – Black, British Former Orphan Dresses Foreign Princesses,’ he said in a mockney voice, then, reverting to his well-spoken self, added: ‘all a bit embarrassing really, as they are just faux royalty from some tin pot principality.  I met them at a party and now they’ve become customers.’

‘A terrific career boost though, ‘I suggested clinking his glass, as he sat down beside me on the huge, low-slung, black leather, Italian sofa. Our eyes met… and… well, you can guess.

We had a wonderful night together, which soon evolved into an easy-going semi-relationship, for about six months, before he became something of a shooting star in in the fickle world of fashion and got swept-up into that swirling whirlpool of cocktails, air-kissing, bitching and bullshit.

We always stayed as friends – we recently ‘added’ each other on People Pages – and subsequently, I couldn’t resist privately asking him my veritable pertinent question in his ‘inbox’: ‘So how is the Princess?’ Knowing full well what his reply would be.

‘Which one?’

//

//

My Unplanned Obsolescence. By Thom Topham. Chapter 9.

11 Dec

My Unplanned Obsolescence.  Chapter 9.

Dreamy Daniels.

The rocky beach outside the cottage, to the North.

The rocky beach outside the cottage, to the North.

Walking by the sea one day,

lost in thought, so far away,

heard a voice inside me say: ‘You’re gonna meet somebody…’

Wondered how this thing might be,

making sense of mystery,

thinking I was suddenly about to find my way.

I'm writing this in the pink one on the corner to the far right of the picture.

I’m writing this in the pink one on the corner to the far right of the picture.

Then, I saw you… walking on the shore.

You looked at me… I looked at you…

need I say more?

I know we’re gonna be forever,

Oh – we’ve got it going on.

I know we’re gonna be forever,

You know –  together we belong.    Together we’ll be strong.  Together we belong.

Then you smiled and I smiled too,

held my hands out, so did you…

heard a voice inside come through ‘I think you’ve found somebody’.

Walking now – we’re getting close

I said:  ‘Hi, you like this coast?’

You replied ‘yeah, it’s the most precious place to me…’

Then, I held you,  we were talking by the shore.

You looked at me, I looked at you…

need I say more

I know we’re gonna be forever,

oh – we’ve got it going on.

I know we’re gonna be forever,

You know –  together we belong.  I know – together we’ll be strong…. yeah…

Together we belong… I know…

Pirates! Tsunami!  Smugglers!  A glass or three of red wine… echo… echo…

I’m woken by a breeze wafting across my face through the open window by the bed (it’s only the next day that the thought occurs to me that ‘said breeze’ was most probably a ‘spirit guide’ gently waking me).  I put on my trifocal glasses, check my iPhone and note that it’s 3am. Drawing-back the curtain, I notice strange lights flashing in the woods on Smuggler’s Spur, the headland.  The yellowish light from a Victorian streetlight on The Cleave outside reveals that the tide is in.  But where’s Goldie?

Together… we… belong… sigh.  DAMN! I’m suddenly  really pissed-off, as I reluctantly realise that it was all a dream!  What an annoyingly cliche’d letdown!

Unfortunately, it now seems that all I will ever ‘get to hold’ of Goldie is a fantasy song – once I write it down.  So I grab a notebook, turn on the bedside light and quickly scribble down the lyrics that are in my head, wondering which great songwriter – who is, obviously, no longer with us – might be channeling through me.  Cole Porter? Ira Gershwin? Jim Morrison?  John Lennon? Dream on Thom; it’s all good, as urban kids always say these days (and now it’s caught-on and everyone is saying it – even Delia, my octogenarian mum).

More lights are flashing in the woods on the headland – I think they must be torches.

Damn that dream!  Why couldn’t it have been true?

A half moon appears from behind a cloud and shines palely across the glassy water – then, strangely, there’s a shadow… moving… something floating, rather large – and it’s heading towards the quay on the other side of the bay. I gulp some more water (a glass or three of vodka echo.. echo), and try to put the thought of doing erotic things to Goldie’s perfect, round, muscular ass (with its fine, soft coating of golden down, no doubt) out of my head.

Smuggler’s Spur… pirates!

It appears to be a large fishing boat, maybe a trawler, with no lights on (why?); and now I can just about make-out dark figures scurrying down the stone steps onto the quay, maybe five or six guys.  Then, just as quickly, they’re carrying dark bundles – bin liners? – back up the steps as the’ stealth’ trawler swiftly backs out into the bay, its engine faintly chugging, then turns around and heads back out to sea.  The dark figures disappear and the torches flash no more.  How deliciously mysterious.  I wonder what they were smuggling:  industrial quantities of cocaine, perhaps (gazillions of pound’s worth), or kilos and kilos of my favourite Thai sticks (that’s premium marijuana, for the uninitiated)? On a more prosaic level;  it was probably tobacco.  There’s still a lot of money to be made with that, I guess.  I turn off the light (I hope the smugglers didn’t notice, otherwise they might kill me), lie back on the soft, white cotton pillows and close my eyes.

Why can’t the smuggling have been the dream – and meeting, and becoming Goldie’s instant lover – the reality?

Life’s a beach, and then you die, I muse, as I fall back into a not-so golden slumber.

I wake up at around 10 O’Clock the next morning. It’s  another cloudless, sunny day (same-old, as people say when they’re a bit spoilt). I reluctantly remind myself that it’s Saturday and therefore my last day at the cottage.  The cleaner will be coming at 11 O’Clock.  I savour my solitary wake-up hour with my customary minty black tea, and toast with honey and banana, before she arrives and cheerily greets me with: ‘Hi! You must be Thom!’

‘Indeed I am!  What’s your name?’ I ask.

She’s new.  The old cleaner had left the village to live with a former Catholic priest in Raleigh, my mother recently revealed to me on the phone, with some relish.

‘I’m Joyce’, she says in her Cornish burr, hurrying into the newly refurbished kitchen in the back, the only room without a sea view, ‘I love your music, you know, I often put on your CDs when I’m cleaning, your stuff is often sad and  poetic,  but it’s always soulful and passionate.’

Wow!  I didn’t expect to hear that coming from the cleaner (no patronising attitude intended), but it’s really good to know. I guess that she’s about thirty-five.  She’s pretty and probably smokes dope.

‘Hey thanks Joyce.  I’m really glad you like my music.’

‘I certainly do. My favourite is Hejiro. I think that’s a really uplifting, even though I don’t  know what it means! She says, busying herself getting cleaning stuff out of the cupboard under the sink. “I sometimes wondered if it was a code for a secret lover.’

‘I wish, but I made the word-up! And I never reveal the meanings of my songs;  I’d rather people interpreted them in relation to their own lives,’ I reply, with a chuckle, ‘I looked it up in the dictionary after I wrote the song and the nearest actual word to it is hejira…’

Oh – and what does that mean?’ She asks, pouring hot water into the plastic mop bucket.

‘Exodus.’  I reply.

‘Ah! Bob Marley! Could you put on Hejira, sorry Hejiro, for me now, nice and loud?’ She asks.

‘My pleasure.’  I reply. ‘Then I’ll go for my last walk before I leave.’

<click into hyperlink below>

Hejiro

Unplanned obsolescence… hejiro…

Get the message… and light a candle.

Everything that you felt was the real and not the dark.

Don’t  get depressed, no, then fly right off the handle,

‘cos your fate’s in your hands and it’s time to light that spark.

Hejiro  – a slight thought of a presence.

Hejiro… it was not my unplanned obsolescence.

All those daydreams that turned to nightmares.

with that hatred and pain that you never ever asked for.

Where was the love, where was the somewhere,

when you worked for the hope, without ever needing to wear a mask?

Hejiro… hejiro… unplanned obsolescence.

Hejiro… hejiro.

Having put on the CD for Joyce, I wander up the hill through the winding lanes (then snigger ironically to myself  – if there’s such a thing – when I realise that I’m singing Kate Bush’s ‘Running Up That Hill‘, in my head), then sit on a bench on the acres of rabbit-mown grass on The Field Of Gravity – as I call it – looking wistfully out to sea and daydreaming about my eponymous, wannabe festival of improvised music in the grounds of the mansion on the river Oudle,  along with stealth trawlers, smugglers and, damn It, Goldie.  Then the words of my dream-fantasy song – ‘Together We Belong’ – come into my head and I can hear the melody –  I’m writing the music in my head and –  it makes me feel good.

Then I’m mentally reminded of my mother’s nickname for me when I was a growing kid – when I was about seven or eight… as-in that picture that I plan to use as the front cover of this book:  me with the big, soulful, sad eyes. The child with the man in his eyes (to paraphrase Kate Bush).

She called me Dreamy Daniels.

Having come back down the hill, I can hear the phone ringing as I put the key into the door of the cottage. I manage to pick-up the phone in time (when people in the know call the cottage they let it ring for a while as the current, temporary residents are often sitting on the sea wall, or on the beach below, which is part and parcel of the magic of staying there). It’s Delia, my mother.  ‘Hi Deal!’  I say (it’s my nickname for her).

‘Hi Dreamy Daniels!’  She says.

‘Wow, Deal, you haven’t called me that for years and years.  What made you address me thus?’

‘Oh, I just said it without thinking darling!’

‘That’s lovely and… a bit extraordinary,’ I say

‘I think I first called you that when we fled Birmingham to live with my mother and father in Bath after I walked-out on your father with you three boys… those great big, dreamy brown eyes you had. Why extraordinary?’

‘Because, by some weird coincidence, I was just thinking about you calling me Dreamy Daniels as a kid.’

‘Well, everything happens for a reason Dreamy Daniels, you know that.’

‘I sure do mother!’

It transpires that ‘Deal’ wants me to read a couple of chapters of her historical novel ‘Emily’s Cameo Brooch’ which she wrote in the 70s and recently re-typed and is re-editing on her iMAC. She wants my opinion as to whether it’s worth continuing to edit and upgrade it. So I’ll read the first chapters, when I get a chance, and see if they draw me in.

It’s only 12.30 and Joyce has finished cleaning the living room, so I can chill out(especially as it’s suddenly started to rain) and perhaps begin to read my 1979 notebook/diary.  I’m booked on train back to London from Raleigh at 16.00 hours, so I’m aiming to catch the  bus at 14.45, which will give me plenty of time, bearing in mind that the bus has to go on the ‘floating bridge’ ferry to get there.  I wouldn’t want to cut it fine, as my booked, budget ticket would be invalid if I missed the specified journey (in the literal sense of the word: as you may have noticed, I really dislike the term when used as  if it were some kind of odyssey, as opposed to a puerile quest for fame). I can read the paper and do the codeword (a clueless crossword) whilst I wait on the platform , in the station cafe, and/or indeed, on the train. All good.

Ah… 1979.  As I recall, one hell of a lot happened in that year, but I wonder how my notebook literally records it?  Is it going to be mostly prose – or poetry, lyrics and songs, like the one from ’78?

I open it. On the first page, there’s a doodle that looks like a sabre and some smoke, then a scribbled  phone number (just seven numbers again) for someone called Chris.

Then, on the next page, I’d written ‘Wow maan, the summer solstice!'(obviously meant to be vaguely ironic) in red felt-tip pen, against the date: ’22nd June 1979’, above my name, address  – still in the grotty basement at 9, St Dukes Road in Notting Hill –  and phone number.  Then, turning the page, I see that I go straight into diary mode on the same day.

“Oh God! A new book. It’s going to be more intimate and revealing, this one, so anyone surreptitiously reading this can expect more juicy revelations and embarrassing creative mistakes than of yore. It’s only ‘notes’ anyway. I can do what I like.  So there.  Actually, you might be interested to know that I am in Bath at the moment, in the front, double bedroom of the third-storey flat (which I  designed, along with the rest of this classic Georgian house) of the family seat in Great Balustrade Street in Bath. And furthermore, it’s been a perfect summer’s day. I sure needed to get away from town and escape from the phone constantly ringing about my spectacular defection from The Eaglekings. I’m getting my new songs ready to demo in a week or two (thanks to Count Leonardo Dimando).  I hope they’re good enough. Don’t panic.  This book signifies the beginning of a new era.”

The Eaglekings had been living and working for several months in a beautiful, rambling, six-bedroom Victorian, riverside house in Wales, which had an attached former chapel, in which we rehearsed and recorded demos of new songs. It was a wonderful space.  I only found-out many, many years later that ‘Briagadier’ Frank Ferrett, the guitarist and singer, had secretly recorded our ‘jam sessions’ and put them out as records, claiming all the songwriting credits (and therefore royalties) for himself.  What a bastard. The band were without a record deal, the charismatic singer Steven Elgin had had a nervous breakdown and had been ‘sectioned’, effectively leaving the band, and the drummer Grahame Radcliffe had also left, having been poached by another band offering more money (well, more money than virtually nothing, which was by now becoming the case). Eddie Prince, the drummer who had left during the recording of the last album, was somehow persuaded to rejoin –  and him and I bonded immediately, not having met before.  I my humble opinion he was definitely the greatest of The Eaglekings’ many drummers – he had a unique, hypnotic, driving style of playing and was also to end-up playing on my second album ‘Torn Genes’ – but more of that later. Eddie and I would play Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Born To Run’ over and over again, in the cosy music/TV room every night, after dinner, which was usually cooked by me.  We ended-up eating mostly vegetables and pasta or rice, as that was all we could (apparently) afford.

The band had no record deal and there were no gigs lined-up in the foreseeable future. I had, however, been beginning to contribute more and more to the songwriting process, and we’d demo’d a couple of them with me singing lead vocals: they sounded terrific. I was back in London for the weekend when Frank Ferret phoned and sprung a major surprise: he’d played the two songs to Neville Brown, the band’s manager, who had been impressed enough to suggest that I become the band’s lead singer. Somewhat shell-shocked, I told Frank that I would think about it, as I was very concerned about the total lack of money to fund this alleged ‘new golden dawn of swords and eternal, exploding supernovas'(or some other space-rock cliche; not that my two songs echoed this at all).

The next day I played the two demos of self-penned songs to Count Leonardo Dimando , who was a newish friend whom I’d met through another relatively new friend called Francesca Hoover-Dyson, whom Christa (still living in the flat upstairs) had introduced to me to as a result of their mutual involvement with various music-video productions.  On hearing the demos, the Count immediately suggested that I should leave the band and ‘go solo’ or form a new band – and offered to pay for me to record enough demos for an album in a proper studio.  I was ecstatic. I immediately called Neville, the Eaglekings’ manager, and told him that I couldn’t accept Ferret’s offer as I was ‘going solo’.

‘Alright cowboy,’ he drawled, sniffing loudly (no doubt with his legs resting on his desk and a rolled-up £50 note in his other hand),’if that’s what you want to do… although I think you’re making a big mistake, I can’t stop you.’

‘Count Leonardo Dimando’s family own at least one of the seven hills of Rome.’  Francesca had revealed when she’d invited me to a party at his house near Cheyne Walk in Chelsea, where I’d met him for the first time, several months previously. Francesca – I think she was in her late-thirties –  was something of a child of Chelsea – or perhaps, more realistically, the down-at-heel part of Earl’s Court.  She was  tiny, and, despite that, had apparently been mildly successful as a model in the 70s (she was always digging out the old photo albums to prove it). She was certainly rather beautiful.  Or had been.  Unfortunately, there was a toxic cloud of bitterness and falseness about her, as if she’d produced a posh, noiseless fart, which made me intuitively back-off, because it stank. And I sensed that she fancied me!  This was proved a couple of years later when she surprised me by drunkenly rubbing her vagina on my leg at a rather rocking, Indian-themed party (all the guests had dressed the part) at her tiny flat in Earl’s Court.  She tended to talk in smooth, syrupy, faux-upper-class tones which made me want to say: ‘Oh for god’s sake: you think people can’t see through your shit?’. But I didn’t.  Maybe I felt sorry for her. To be honest, with hindsight, I think I was fascinated to dip a metaphorical toe into the muddied waters of privilege and poshness of The Royal Borough – and all the ships which sailed through it, sounding their  hooray foghorns. And I was probably waiting to see what, if anything, might occur, although I wasn’t holding out too much hope of enlightenment other than confirmation that most of them were inbred (allegedly pedigree) assholes.  You know what lots of people say about dogs:  Pedigrees are generally stupid.  Mongrels are the ones to love.  Certainly true in my experience.

Count Leonardo’s home was a symphony of understated good taste, which helped me to continue with my anthropological study of that particular sub-species, The Chelsea Set.  This was a spacious Victorian house with a smallish patio garden, which featured white gravel and raised flowerbeds made of railway sleepers. It was beautifully planted with bamboo and and succulents, and subtly lit (as all outdoor spaces should be).  Leonardo had noted my smile of pleasure when I’d walked-in to the roomy, open-plan living area and was happy to accept my request to show me around. All the walls were white and the floors were covered in simple, coir, fitted-carpets. The white sofas and chairs were long, low, classic-modern-Italian.  There were antique, white marble, working  – well, coal-effect, gas and pumice stone – fireplaces in every room with marble obelisks and lots of massive church candles on the mantlepieces, then huge, ornate, antique mirrors with gold, gilt frames alongside cool black-and-white prints from the 50s on the walls. The lighting was soft, warm and flattering – a mixture of ceiling spots and antique and classic-modern table and floor lamps, all controlled by dimmers by the door. Bland-with-soul, if you like, in order to sell-on.  Clever.

Leonardo, an average-looking, balding man dressed in ironed (with a CREASE! Yuck!), pre-faded, Armani jeans, a pink Lacoste polo shirt and Gucci Loafers –  that dreary uniform of the posh, Euro-trash male –  looked quite a lot like Prince Albert of Monaco, and appeared older than his thirty-five years. We talked about design, architecture and art… we got on. He was intelligent and educated.  He explained that he bought period ‘wrecks’ in good areas and knocked-down walls to make them open-plan and tarted-them-up in this neutral, yet warm and stylish manner – then sold them on at a huge profit and continued to ‘move-on-up; (an all-time fave from Curtis Mayfield in 1970) the property ladder. I was fascinated and somewhat envious.  How much I’d have loved, and still would, to do something similar, but with, perhaps more originality; a leaning toward accommodating the unique needs of artistry? A blank canvas, perfectly presented. With style. I’m still waiting, despite all the kudos of people complimenting me on the retro-modern style of Rancho Deluxe, my current, NYC-loft-style home in North West London.

Was it also around that time that I met the Spanish painter Carlos Amigos who lived in the capacious basement of a stunning, six-storey Georgian house owned by his Swedish, industrialist millionaire ex-lover Sven,  which was actually on Cheyne walk, overlooking a bridge called Albert, one of London’s most beautiful? The vague mystique of the Chelsea mists of time.  All I know now is that I hovered (or is that hoovered?) around for while, like a boho, token semi-rock star who was apparently quite fanciable. The Chelsea Set. however, soon tired of me though (no doubt I was too forthright, middle-class and left-field), and more so, me of them. The Count, however, stayed on board the Topham train of thought (and deeds) for a few more years.

He owned an enormous,  5,000 Square-foot, minimalist loft apartment in New York’s East Village (in 1979 – waaaay before it was chic), with a two-storey ‘Greek Temple’ at one end housing the two bedrooms, kitchen and bathrooms. The only furniture in the living space was three huge, white-leather day beds. Cool. Super cool. Apart from his ironed, designer jeans with a crease

Leonardo's amazing Loft in NYC's Lower East Side

Leonardo’s amazing Loft in NYC’s Lower East Side

It never occurred to me that Leonardo, my new friend and vague cultural ambassador, the Italian Count, might have had a secret crush on me which was to last for over four years – until I rejected his sudden and unexpected, cocaine-fuelled advances in NYC on our second visit in 1983.  I immediately fled, getting the next available plane back to London – you were able to book cheap, standby seats in those days – after he’d suddenly flown into a rage, accusing me of being ‘a grasping whore’, which was totally unfounded in any respect, after I’d politely-but-firmly rejected him.  I was extremely shocked and very hurt.

Allow me a flashback.  I think it was possibly a year later than 1979, but no matter. My mind takes me back to that fabulous Georgian house overlooking Albert Bridge.  Carlos, who was handsome, swarthy and hirsute, lived in the basement.  He was dark, from the South of Spain – with some traces of the Moor (and mooreish) about him. His work was quite Picasso-esque and pleasing to the eye. His ex-lover Sven, who owned this magnificent house, was stupidly rich and entertained lavishly, largely on the gay-mafia level: i.e people who were incredibly successful in, mostly, the creative industries: and who (no surprise here then) ‘attracted’ loads of good-looking young men; like proverbial moths to their financially-secure flames.

Therefore, most of those gay-mafia types automatically assumed – me being twenty-eight or so, and not ugly –  that I was also a hustler, rent-boy, escort or whatever.  Of course, I wasn’t.  But that was their twisted mindset.  Deeply depressing. Cold as ice. Diamond dogs.

Me at home in 1979

Me at home in 1979

One sultry summer night, I was invited to a party there (perhaps there was a link via the Italian Count with coal-effect, gas-fires-with-pumice-stones in every room? But Leonardo didn’t  actually know Sven, to my knowledge). The guests were gathered in the massive,  first-floor, double drawing room with it’s floor-to-ceiling sash windows leading out onto an ornate balcony overlooking the Bridge, which was festooned with thousands of yellowish lights (and still is), and the river.  About twenty or thirty people were there, drinking vintage wine and champagne and being served canapes by handsome, topless waiters with flawless bodies.  I helped myself to a glass of fine Rioja Reserva from a silver tray, and a couple of smoked salmon and caviar blinis and found a space on one of three, huge, pale-blue velvet-covered sofas which were arranged in a U-shape in order to take-in the amazing view.  A very good-looking, tall and athletic black gay came and sat on the next sofa to mine and smiled at me curiously, as if to say: ‘don’t I know you?’ Now I was racking my brain: he certainly looked familiar. After he had engaged in some pleasantries with a guy who turned-out to own a very successful, independent record label, he turned to me and asked: ‘Don’t I know you, I’m sure we’ve met – what’s your name?

I think… perhaps we have,’ I replied, ‘my name’s Thom – spelt with an H.’

‘Thom… Thom.  That rings a bell!’ He said loudly.  ‘My name’s Devon. So where did we meet?’

By now my memory-bank had kicked-in – and the other guests were starting to take an interest in our little intrigue. But I wasn’t about to let on. Devon, meanwhile, persisted, becoming more urgent in his ‘need to know’.  Perhaps he was on cocaine. I tried to send him subtle, mental messages that I was not telling him for a good reason.  Now the whole room was being drawn into our interchange, as I continued to resist revealing where our rendezvous had been.

‘It was some time last year, I think.’  I said vaguely.

‘But where and how?’  I think he was also quite drunk. Everyone was looking at us.

‘Are you sure you want to know?’  I asked, my eyes trying to tell him to stop asking.

‘Yes, yes – it’s driving me mad Thom!’

I had no choice in this glamourous, soapy, drawing-room drama, as he wouldn’t give-up, and so decided to reveal all… finally stating in a slow, calm voice: ‘Well, Devon, we met in Holland Walk late one night…’ Sharp intakes of breath all-round (The ‘Walk’ is one of London’s most notorious-yet-beautiful cruising spots), ‘and we jumped over the fence and I fucked you in the park!’

There.  I’d said it. ‘Well you were insistent.’ I added, as he appeared to blush slightly (he was quite light-skinned) and I smiled and shrugged.

‘Ah, I see, no I don’t think that was me!’

‘Oh yes it was.’

Devon, perhaps understandably, made his excuses and left.  Sven winked at me from the other end of the room and motioned for me to come over and join him.

‘That was hilarious!’ He said, grinning mischievously, his steely-blue eyes twinkling. Then I noticed some extraordinary artefacts arranged on the back-lit glass shelves behind him, in the alcove to the right of the second fireplace. There were scores of tiny, sparkling, colourful and intricately decorated ovoid shapes on the shelves. ‘Are those what I think they are?’ I whispered conspiratorially.

‘They are indeed Faberge eggs, he replied with an indulgent smile.’

I gasped slightly, then, thinking aloud, posited: ‘but anyone could slip one in their pocket!’

He chuckled. ‘No – no-one would dare, because they are no strangers here – and the house has an elaborate alarm system.  I would know who had helped themselves.

‘But they must be worth millions!

‘Yes, they are.  They’re my glittering pension fund.  Although, of course, I’d never willingly sell them.’

I found them utterly lacking in any intrinsic style or grace – they were merely vulgar and over-the top, like an expensive Euro-trash whore in a disco in St Tropez.  But, hey, they were Faberge Eggs.

After a while, his handsome ex-lover came and claimed me and we went downstairs to his basement flat and had a night of hot passion.

I blink as I return from my reverie.  I can hear a vacuum cleaner upstairs, and Joyce singing my song ‘The Keeper Of The Keys‘ to herself, which is rather pleasing.  I go to the kitchen and get some juice out of the fridge.  There’s still plenty of time until I have to get the bus to Raleigh, so I sit at the table and pick-up where I left-off with my notebook from ’79.

“I  really only like writing recto (on the right page of my notebooks), as I’m left-handed.  Shall I be a little extravagant? Yeah.  Got this nice new pen as well. Three new notebooks and six pens – for less than a night out at The Tropicana, my usual haunt in Earls Court. Oh, it’s just work and sex – fundamentals. I love sunny Saturday afternoons in Bath. The city shimmers with a golden glow from the local stone.  I’ll meet a dream man in the street and we’ll go and coffee in my favourite cafe.  Some hope!

Work is the big deal at the moment, along with keeping my confidence high.  That is proving to be a bit of a strain at the mo’.  At least I’ve managed to blag some studio time with my erstwhile music publisher Warmer Music (they’re totally useless, despite being a multinational corporation) to make ‘demo-demos’  – playing everything, using a Linn drum machine and keyboards, to sort-out which of my prolific output I should soon demo properly with actual musicians in the real studio, funded by Leonardo.

The song title show carries ever on…

‘The Outsider’, Blind Alley’, ‘Caught In A Trap’. Totally Wasted’, ‘Who’s Afraid Of The Dark’, ‘Somebody Just Stole Your Thunder’, ‘Aint Gonna Be No Stepping Stone’. ‘Street Dog’…

‘Only gods get control of situations, only dogs keep their noses to the ground’.

‘Notes hang low in the mist above the river… hopes get blown like the paper in the street’.

Then – ‘The Outsider’.

‘I am the outsider, a player of parts, you read what you want to, I don’t hide my heart.

I am the outsider, I don’t like your games, your kudos and status, your material gains’.”

On the next page there’s a list of already-written songs, many of which made it onto the ensuing album (yes – it really did happen!), then a list of band-name ideas, which I rather modestly thought I might need to instigate, in order to be successful: The Individuals. The Windows.  the Outsiders. The Clocks. The Government. The Opposition.  The Senate. The Business. The Consumers.  The Apprentices… all rather ahead of their time, in a way; but, as it turned-out, it just ended-up being me – the  forever-solo artist. The loneliness of the long-distance bummer.

“Sat June 30th 1979. 4am.

Oh what a week that was. Hello new demos (recorded in the little studio at Warmer Music)  – goodbye stereo (police: case no 1982).  Hello ME – goodbye England (I wish).  And Christa’s dog somehow managed to eat the last of my sleeping pills and she threw up all over my carpet.”

I recall that my mother had posted me a gold chain which was part of a collection of gold coins that she’d bought for the family business in her capacity as a numismatist, but it was surplus to requirements.  She’d sent it by Recorded Delivery, which meant that I had to sign for it when the postman came, but, of course (being the eternal nocturnal), I’d been asleep, and had to go to the Royal Mail Sorting Office to pick it up.

” Backtrack to Tuesday June 26th 1979. 4pm.

Came back from lunch and a walk in the park via the Sorting Office with my gold chain to find the front door smashed-in and, inevitably, the only thing of any value, the stereo, gone – although they did leave my giant Wharfedale speakers.  Totally traumatised, freaked out and paranoid.  No sex all week either; probably just as well.  I finally got to talk to an American hunk, who I’ve been after for weeks, last night in the Tropicana. Just another fucking air steward – but oh so nice-looking. Should be alright there. Then I met  my new young friend Ryan (Chung, a lovely-looking half Chinese/half Jamaican) walking home and he treated me to breakfast things from the all-night supermarket. We slept together, but I couldn’t bring myself to seduce him as, aged eighteen, he’s just too young.  Tender/tough, but street-wise, having grown-up on a rough council estate locally.”

I put the book down and get a glass of water from the kitchen, trying to recall how the door got fixed after the burglary – I think maybe Leonardo payed for it – then chuckle as I recall him driving down The Earl’s Court road one summer evening with Christa and Maddox in the back of his olive-green Rolls Royce, and me in front.  Christa was ostentatiously (but ironically, of course) talking on his car phone  –  a very rare and many-splendoured thing in those days –  in her Queen Of Hearts voice, with the windows open, so everyone would notice. And we just laughed forever throughout what often seemed to be an enchanted summer.

This triggers another rather amusing memory of a woman calling my phone in the summer of that same, eventful year – 1979 –  and asking in a posh voice if she could speak to Lady Cheyne.  Rather then telling her that it was the wrong number, I put my hand over the receiver to stifle my giggles, then said, as if I were the butler: ‘‘Can I put you on hold madam, I’ll see if I can find her ladyship, I believe she’s cutting roses in the garden.’ I then raced upstairs to get Christa, who rushed down and did a wonderful job of being ‘Lady Cheyne’. The calls carried on for several months; with the mystery woman apparently not suspecting a thing. I wonder who she actually was?

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